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Programming Digest#449

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this week's favorite

Computer networking basics every developer should know

As a software engineer, I need to deal with networking every now and then - be it configuring a SOHO network, setting up container networking, or troubleshooting connectivity between servers in a data center. The domain is pretty broad, and the terminology can get quite confusing quickly. This article is my layman's attempt to sort the basic things out with the minimum words and maximum drawings. The primary focus will be on the Data link layer (OSI L2) of wired networks where the Ethernet is the king nowadays. But I'll slightly touch upon its neighboring layers too.

Measuring software complexity: What metrics to use?

Our work, as developers, pushes us to take many decisions, from the architectural design to the code implementation. How do we make these decisions? Most of the time, we follow what “feel right”, that is, we rely on our intuition. It comes from our experience, an important source of information. But the same intuition can the source of many problems too. We’re humans, and we are subjects to many biases leading to wrong assumptions.

Five books that changed my career as a software engineer

Well, I’m here to talk about five books that helped me a lot in my career regarding decision making, strategies to solve problems, general knowledge, soft skills, and motivation.

A primer on product management for engineers

Breaking down the basics and benefits for engineers looking to manage product development with precision and verve.

Floating point visually explained

While I was writing a book about Wolfenstein 3D, I wanted to vividly demonstrate how much of a handicap it was to work without floating points. My personal attempts at understanding floating points using canonical articles were met with significant resistance from my brain.