Digests » 275

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Alice Goldfuss. Casey Rosenthal. Seth Vargo. And you?

The O'Reilly Velocity Conference is returning to New York City, September 30-October 3—and just wait until you see who will be there: Alice Goldfuss (Site Reliability Engineer, GitHub), Casey Rosenthal (CTO, Backplane), Seth Vargo (Developer Advocate, Google), plus another 72 experts and thoughtleaders. And that's just the speakers. Velocity attendees are a pretty fascinating bunch, too. Don't miss this unique opportunity to discuss the latest in DevOps, Systems Engineering, and Infrastructure with those working on the front lines. Use code PDIG20 to save 20% on your Gold, Silver, or Bronze pass. That's a savings of up to $599 when you register during Early Price, now through August 17!

programming

Emulator 101

Writing an arcade game emulator is an awesome learning project, and this tutorial will take you through the entire process in a very detailed way. Want to really learn how a CPU works? Writing an emulator is the best way to learn about it.

Cherry MX History: A German Company With American Roots

The famed mechanical keyboard switch manufacturer Cherry has been around since the 1950s—but it’s only been defined by keyboard switches in the past decade.

DOOM’s Development: A Year of Madness

“Does it run DOOM?” is the oft-heard phrase as it is the canonical first-port for any system, be it a toaster, touch bar or printer. Programmer, game designer, level designer and DOOM II final boss John Romero delivers a postmortem on the game showing rarely seen material, memorializing its immersive but nerve-wracking 3D environments, networked multiplayer deathmatches, demonic imagery and themes, Barney WADs, exploding barrels, and BFG 9000.

Bootable CD + retro game in a tweet

A few years ago, I crafted a bootable floppy disk and a retro game which fit in a tweet. Since then, Twitter doubled the length of tweets, so I decided to handcraft a bootable CD. The bootable disk runs a slightly improved version of tron.

Teenager Finds Classical Alternative to Quantum Recommendation Algorithm

18-year-old Ewin Tang has proven that classical computers can solve the “recommendation problem” nearly as fast as quantum computers. The result eliminates one of the best examples of quantum speedup.