Digests » 427

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this week's favorite

A day in the life of a professional software engineer

If you’re a graduate interviewing for a software job and wondering what a typical day is like, here’s some notes from what I did last Tuesday. It was a pretty typical day.

On the diverse and fantastical shapes of testing

There's been a recent resurgence on twitter and the like about how teams should divide up their testing efforts. In particular, Tim Bray argues compellingly in favor of taking automated testing seriously. Anyone familiar with my writing will know that I'm very much in agreement with him.

5 really bad practices that make other developers hate your code

Wait, what? BAD coding practices? Yes, you’ve read correctly. The internet is full of good advice and tutorials for developers already. You can find some even on this blog. This article will totally be different though – sorry. But wait, I will show you something even better! It’s five cardinal sins you can commit in your code. Those bad programming practices are so evil that every developer will hate your work. Are you ready to possess this secret knowledge? Come along then.

The greatest regex trick ever

So you're doubtful at the mention of a "best regex trick"? Fine. I'll concede right away that deciding what constitutes the best technique in any field is a curly matter.

3 terrible programming features from the past

I'm a strong believer in the programming truism that most bad features have a good reason to exist. The much hated goto statement can tunnel out of a deeply nested block structure quickly and cleanly, in experienced hands. A certain amount of type looseness lets code be leaner and less awkward. Memory pointers might make you hate life, but they were critically important for all the years that computer hardware was weaker than a Nest thermostat. And so on.